Our projects work to improve, enhance, restore, and protect

the ecological and economic resiliency of the grasslands, woodlands, forests, riparian corridors, and communities within the Zuni Mountain Landscape by working collaboratively across a diversity of interests. The Collaborative actively monitors sensitive plants, stream and riparian areas, sediment deposits, and soil data, as well as maintains a weather station and an invasive species inventory in the Zuni Mountains.

Weather station, Zuni Mountains

Weather station, Zuni Mountains

Our restoration vision is a landscape where the vegetation is resilient in the face of climate change, resistant to uncharacteristic crown fires, and supports healthy animal and human communities.

we support management actions to...

  • Reduce the risk of uncharacteristic wildfire
  • Restore natural fire regimes
  • Increase forest diversity and old growth characteristics
  • Utilize woody by-products
  • Improve fish and wildlife habitat
  • Improve water quality and watershed functions  
  • Mitigate climate change impacts

Restoration Vision

Managed burn in the Zuni Mountains

Managed burn in the Zuni Mountains

The vision for the Zuni Mountains is a landscape where the vegetation is resilient in the face of climate change, resistant to uncharacteristic crown fires, and supports healthy animal and human communities. Restoration is the best tool available for achieving this vision. The overarching goal of restoration is to return forest communities to conditions that are within the natural range of variability, i.e., state that is within the spectrum of conditions that occurred before extensive modification of fire regime that occurred as Euroamericans settled the region. A restored landscape means restoration of ecosystem processes, particularly fire. Restoring fire as a natural process is the most effective and cost efficient way to ensure maintenance of healthy conditions.